Group of marchers on World AIDS Day

Why Take Action?

Taking action is critical to assuring conditions for health and wellbeing for all. Consistent with the action plan, this may involve advocating for or implementing programs and policies that address priority issues.

 

Key Questions to Consider

  • What will success for the action look like (e.g., conditions that will change, improved outcomes)?
  • What promising practices (or evidence-based interventions) will be implemented to improve conditions and desired outcomes?
  • What particular components and elements will we use in our intervention?
  • How do we need to adapt the intervention so that its fits our situation?
  • What available resources and assets will support implementation?
  • How will we deliver the intervention so that it achieves results and reaches those who most need to benefit?
  • Ado we have the necessary conditions necessary for success of the action/intervention (e.g., time, money, people, leadership, technical assistance)?

 

Some Recommended Actions

  1.  __ Identify what “success” for the action or intervention would look like. Include:
    • Description of what success would look like. How will conditions for the community or group—including those most affected—be different if the intervention is successful?
    • Specific objectives the intervention will achieve. What (conditions, behaviors, outcomes) will change, by how much, and by when? What inequities between groups will be reduced?
  2. __ Identify and assess promising practices (evidence-based and practice-based interventions) that could help address the problem or goal.
  3. __ Specify the core components and elements of the intervention based on the analysis and identified promising practices. Be specific about elements to be included for each of these five components.
    • Providing information and enhancing skills (e.g., public announcements, skill training)
    • Modifying access, barriers and opportunities (e.g., improved access to health services)
    • Enhancing services and supports (e.g., peer support groups)
    • Changing the consequences (e.g., increasing incentives for desired behavior)
    • Modifying policies and broader systems (e.g., business and public policies)
  4. __ Identify resources and assets to be used in the activities or intervention (e.g., people, financial resources, knowledge and skills, technologies).
  5. __ Indicate how you will deliver the intervention so that it achieves results and reaches those who most need to benefit (e.g., involve trusted networks and community-based organizations in delivery).
  6. __ Indicate how you will adapt the intervention (promising practice) to fit the needs and context of your community (e.g., differences in resources, values, interests, experiences, competence, language, power).
  7. __ Develop an action plan to carry out the intervention. Include:
    • The core components and specific elements to be implemented
    • Who should do what by when
    • Resources and supports needed and those already available
    • Anticipated barriers and/or resistance and planned counteraction
    • Communication and organizations that need to be informed

 

Examples of Taking Action

 

Resources for Taking Action

Tools from the Community Tool Box

Toolkit: Developing an Intervention

Toolkit: Advocating for Change

Toolkit: Influencing Policy Development

Tools from WHO and Other Sources

A conceptual framework for action on the social determinants of health

Implementation Tools: Package of Essential Noncommunicable (PEN) disease interventions for primary health care in low-resource settings

Comprehensive implementation plan on maternal, infant and young child nutrition

Mental health action plan 2013 – 2020

WHO Humanitarian response plans 2015

A conceptual framework for action on the social determinants of health

Implementation Tools: Package of Essential Noncommunicable (PEN) disease interventions for primary health care in low-resource settings